Update - California's Proposed RFID Bill Vetoed by Governor Schwarzenegger

Posted by Joe Addiego

            As reported last Friday, September 29, 2006, Senate Bill No. 768, a/k/a the Identity Information Protection Action of 2006, which would have imposed new regulations on the use of radio frequency identification (“RFID”) cards issued by governmental bodies, was on the desk of Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger awaiting signature to be passed into law.

            On September 30, the Governor vetoed the bill, calling it “premature.” Several of the reasons given for the veto, including that the bill imposed expensive and burdensome restrictions that could quell the use of RFID technology, were those discussed in my prior blog post. Also, the veto states that the bill potentially conflicted with federal law.

            Questions still remain as to whether restrictions like those proposed in the now-defunct (temporarily, at least) IIPA are necessary to protect the privacy of RFID card users. Expect similar laws to be proposed in the future.

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California's New RFID Bill Would Impose New Restrictions on Governmental Agencies that Issue RFID Cards to Safeguard User Privacy

Posted by Joe Addiego

On September 1, 2006, the California Senate approved Senate Bill No. 768, a/k/a the Identity Information Protection Action of 2006, which would regulate the use of radio frequency identification (“RFID”) cards issued by governmental bodies. Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger has until the end of the month to sign the bill into law.

RFID is a burgeoning technology that has numerous potential security, record keeping, and commercial applications. For example, it currently is used for passkeys to buildings and electronic payment on toll bridges and toll roads, but it also is being adopted for many other uses, including identification cards and drivers licenses, “touchless” payment transactions, and medical care and records tracking. The technology is attractive, because RFID cards communicate via a short range radio signal with a reader, allowing high speed and simultaneous data transfer without physical contact or human intervention.

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RFID Hacking

Posted by Brian Bennett

Here are a few other ways you'll be able to be ripped off in the future. As Radio Frequency Identification ("RFID") technology becomes ubiquitous, the ability of hackers to gain access to, or "clone," RFIDs will become more prevalent, even when the RFIDs are implanted in your arm. This article looks at some of the uses and vulnerabilities of RFID technology, which might be worth looking into before you agree to the implantation procedure.

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